# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Army JROTC III Task 260440720

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Analyze technological advancements.

Definition

Analysis should include
  • identifying technologies that might include
    • automatic rifles
    • machine guns
    • airplanes
    • tanks
    • submarines
    • trinitrotoluene (TNT) and other explosives
    • missiles/rocketry
    • atom bomb/nuclear weapons
    • targeting systems
    • global positioning systems (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS)
    • communication systems
    • sonar
    • radar
  • military events that led to the use of specific technologies
  • the effect of technologies on military outcomes
  • the continuing influence of military technologies on society (e.g., communications, transportation).

Process/Skill Questions

  • What techniques might one use to compare and analyze technological advancements?
  • What technology gives an advantage in daily situations?
  • What are some disadvantages of a recent technological advancement?

Related Standards of Learning

English

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

VUS.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the emerging role of the United States in world affairs during the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by

  1. explaining changes in foreign policy of the United States toward Latin America and Asia and the growing influence of the United States, with emphasis on the impact of the Spanish-American War;
  2. evaluating the United States’ involvement in World War I, including Wilson’s Fourteen Points; and
  3. evaluating and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, with emphasis on the national debate in response to the League of Nations.

VUS.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II by

  1. analyzing the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war, including the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the American response;
  2. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the European theater;
  3. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the Pacific theater;
  4. evaluating and explaining how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources, including the role of all-minority military units (the Tuskegee Airmen and Nisei regiments) and the contributions of media, minorities, and women to the war effort;
  5. analyzing the Holocaust (Hitler’s “final solution”), its impact on Jews and other groups, and the postwar trials of war criminals; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the treatment of prisoners of war and civilians by the Allied and Axis powers.