# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Army JROTC II Task 703835791

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Define the seven citizenship skills included in the Preamble to the Constitution.

Definition

Definition should include the following skills:
  • Cooperation – “We the people,” not we the individuals; work together as a group
  • Patience – A “more” perfect union; take progressive steps towards a better situation
  • Fairness – “Establish justice;” consider the common good as well as individual desires
  • Respect – “Insure domestic tranquility;” accept your fellow citizens
  • Strength – “Provide for the common defense;” stand up for what is right, denounce what is wrong, and admit your mistakes
  • Self-improvement – “Promote the general welfare;” seek knowledge and skills
  • Balance – “Secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity;” support our nation’s ideals (freedom, equality, and unity) by harmonizing or compromising solutions to our problems

Process/Skill Questions

  • How do the seven citizenship skills relate to the Preamble?
  • How can self-improvement make one a better citizen?

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

11.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Explain the meaning of literary and classical allusions and figurative language in text.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

12.3

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, derivations, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development in authentic texts.
  1. Use structural analysis of roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms, to understand complex words.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  4. Explain the meaning of common idioms, and literary and classical allusions in text.
  5. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.4

The student will apply social science skills to understand the Constitution of the United States by

  1. examining the ratification debates and The Federalist;
  2. evaluating the purposes for government stated in the Preamble;
  3. examining the fundamental principles upon which the Constitution of the United States is based, including the rule of law, consent of the governed, limited government, separation of powers, and federalism;
  4. defining the structure of the national government outlined in Article I, Article II, and Article III; and
  5. analyzing and explaining the amendment process.

GOVT.16

The student will apply social science skills to understand that in a democratic republic, thoughtful and effective participation in civic life is characterized by

  1. exercising personal character traits such as trustworthiness, responsibility, and honesty;
  2. obeying the law and paying taxes;
  3. serving as a juror;
  4. participating in the political process and voting in local, state, and national elections;
  5. performing public service;
  6. keeping informed about current issues;
  7. respecting differing opinions and the rights of others;
  8. practicing personal and fiscal responsibility;
  9. demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that foster the responsible and respectful use of digital media; and
  10. practicing patriotism.

VUS.5

The student will apply social science skills to understand the development of the American political system by

  1. examining founding documents to explore the development of American constitutional government, with emphasis on the significance of the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom in the framing of the Bill of Rights;
  2. describing the major compromises necessary to produce the Constitution of the United States, with emphasis on the roles of James Madison and George Washington;
  3. assessing the arguments of Federalists and Anti-Federalists during the ratification debates in defense of the principles and issues that led to the development of political parties; and
  4. evaluating the impact of how John Marshall’s precedent-setting decisions that established the Supreme Court as an independent and equal branch of the national government.