# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Army JROTC II Task 449556303

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Research the effects of technological advances on society.

Definition

Research should include
  • selecting a specific technology that has impacted the military
  • describing the history of the technology and how it has evolved over time
  • describing the benefits of the technology
  • describing any significant social application the technology has had beyond the military
  • documenting researched sources of information.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What specific technological advancement has affected your generation the most? Explain.
  • How can a technological advancement have positive and negative effects on society? Give examples.

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.8

The student will find, evaluate, and select credible resources to create a research product.
  1. Verify the accuracy, validity, and usefulness of information.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias.
  3. Evaluate and select evidence from a variety of sources to introduce counter claims and to support claims.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

11.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Critically evaluate quality, accuracy, and validity of information.
  2. Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view or bias.
  3. Synthesize relevant information from primary and secondary sources and present it in a logical sequence.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

12.8

The student will analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and organize information from a variety of credible resources to produce a research product.
  1. Frame, analyze, and synthesize information to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  2. Analyze information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, point of view, or bias.
  3. Critically evaluate the accuracy, quality, and validity of the information.
  4. Cite sources for both quoted and paraphrased ideas using a standard method of documentation, such as that of the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).
  5. Define the meaning and consequences of plagiarism and follow ethical and legal guidelines for gathering and using information.
  6. Demonstrate ethical use of the Internet.

History and Social Science

VUS.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II by

  1. analyzing the causes and events that led to American involvement in the war, including the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the American response;
  2. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the European theater;
  3. describing and locating the major battles and key leaders of the Pacific theater;
  4. evaluating and explaining how the United States mobilized its economic and military resources, including the role of all-minority military units (the Tuskegee Airmen and Nisei regiments) and the contributions of media, minorities, and women to the war effort;
  5. analyzing the Holocaust (Hitler’s “final solution”), its impact on Jews and other groups, and the postwar trials of war criminals; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the treatment of prisoners of war and civilians by the Allied and Axis powers.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WHII.10

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War I and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining economic and political causes and identifying major leaders of the war, with emphasis on Woodrow Wilson and Kaiser Wilhelm II;
  2. describing the location of major battles and the role of new technologies;
  3. analyzing and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the actions of the League of Nations, with emphasis on the mandate system;
  4. citing causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution;
  5. explaining the causes and assessing the impact of worldwide depression in the 1930s; and
  6. examining the rise of totalitarianism.

WHII.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining the major causes of the war;
  2. describing the leaders of the war, with emphasis on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;
  3. describing the major events, including major battles and the role of new technologies;
  4. examining the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the twentieth century; and
  5. examining the effects of the war, with emphasis on the terms of the peace, the war crimes trials, the division of Europe, plans to rebuild Germany and Japan, and the creation of international cooperative organizations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948).