# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Army JROTC II Task 1085701518

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe the benefits of having mathematical skills in a military occupation.

Definition

Description should include any number of examples of how mathematics is used in day-to-day operations (e.g., logistical information) and how mathematics is used more specifically and at an advanced level (e.g., engineering).

Process/Skill Questions

  • How do basic mathematical skills affect one's day-to-day life?
  • What mathematical skills are used in engineering?

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

Mathematics

AII.3

The student will solve
  1. absolute value linear equations and inequalities;
  2. quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers;
  3. equations containing rational algebraic expressions; and
  4. equations containing radical expressions.

AII.7

The student will investigate and analyze linear, quadratic, absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic function families algebraically and graphically. Key concepts include< /br>
  1. domain, range, and continuity;
  2. intervals in which a function is increasing or decreasing;
  3. extrema;
  4. zeros;
  5. intercepts;
  6. values of a function for elements in its domain;
  7. connections between and among multiple representations of functions using verbal descriptions, tables, equations, and graphs;
  8. end behavior;
  9. vertical and horizontal asymptotes;
  10. inverse of a function; and
  11. composition of functions algebraically and graphically.

AII.10

The student will represent, create, and solve problems, including practical problems, involving inverse variation, joint variation, and a combination of direct and inverse variations.

COM.1

The student will design and apply computer programs to solve practical problems in mathematics arising from business and applications in mathematics.

COM.7

The student will select and call library functions to process data, as appropriate.

COM.8

The student will implement conditional statements that include “if/then” statements, “if/then/else” statements, case statements, and Boolean logic.

COM.9

The student will implement pre-defined algorithms, including sort routines, search routines, and simple animation routines.

COM.16

The student will describe the way the computer stores, accesses, and processes variables, including the following topics: the use of variables versus constants, parameter passing, scope of variables, and local versus global variables.

DM.3*

The student will apply graphs to conflict-resolution problems, such as map coloring, scheduling, matching, and optimization.

DM.8

The student will describe and apply sorting algorithms and coding algorithms used in sorting, processing, and communicating information.

DM.9*

The student will select, justify, and apply an appropriate technique to solve a logic problem.

DM.10

The student will use algorithms to schedule tasks in order to determine a minimum project time. The algorithms will include critical path analysis, the list-processing algorithm, and student-created algorithms.

G.8

The student will solve problems, including practical problems, involving right triangles. This will include applying
  1. the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse;
  2. properties of special right triangles; and
  3. trigonometric ratios.

G.9

The student will verify and use properties of quadrilaterals to solve problems, including practical problems.

G.11

The student will solve problems, including practical problems, by applying properties of circles. This will include determining
  1. angle measures formed by intersecting chords, secants, and/or tangents;
  2. lengths of segments formed by intersecting chords, secants, and/or tangents;
  3. arc length; and
  4. area of a sector.

G.13

The student will use surface area and volume of three-dimensional objects to solve practical problems.

G.14

The student will apply the concepts of similarity to two- or three-dimensional geometric figures. This will include
  1. comparing ratios between lengths, perimeters, areas, and volumes of similar figures;
  2. determining how changes in one or more dimensions of a figure affect area and/or volume of the figure;
  3. determining how changes in area and/or volume of a figure affect one or more dimensions of the figure; and
  4. solving problems, including practical problems, about similar geometric figures.

PS.1*

The student will analyze graphical displays of univariate data, including dotplots, stemplots, boxplots, cumulative frequency graphs, and histograms, to identify and describe patterns and departures from patterns, using central tendency, spread, clusters, gaps, and outliers.

PS.2*

The student will analyze numerical characteristics of univariate data sets to describe patterns and departures from patterns, using mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation, interquartile range, range, and outliers.

PS.4*

The student will analyze scatterplots to identify and describe the relationship between two variables, using shape; strength of relationship; clusters; positive, negative, or no association; outliers; and influential points.

PS.8*

The student will describe the methods of data collection in a census, sample survey, experiment, and observational study and identify an appropriate method of solution for a given problem setting.

PS.17

The student, given data from a large sample, will determine and interpret point estimates and confidence intervals for parameters. The parameters will include proportion and mean, difference between two proportions, difference between two means (independent and paired), and slope of a least-squares regression line.