CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Demonstrate big-picture thinking.

Definition

Demonstration includes
  • defining big-picture thinking as an understanding of one's role in fulfilling the mission of the workplace and a consideration of the social, economic, and environmental effects of one's actions
  • identifying the organization’s structure, culture, policies, and procedures, as well as its role and position within the community, industry, and economy.

Process/Skill Questions

  • Why is it important to understand where one fits within the family, school, workplace, and community?
  • How might a person’s actions affect the school, community, and workplace?
  • How do an organization’s vision and mission statements help people understand the organization’s big picture?
  • How can knowledge of the big picture of an industry help with career planning?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.1

The student will use effective oral communication skills in a variety of settings.
  1. Listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  2. Participate as a facilitator and a contributor in a group.
  3. Participate in collaborative discussions with partners building on others’ ideas.
  4. Ask questions to clarify the speaker’s purpose and perspective.
  5. Summarize the main points a speaker makes.
  6. Summarize and evaluate group activities.
  7. Analyze the effectiveness of participant interactions.
  8. Evaluate own contributions to discussions.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to collaborate with diverse teams.
  10. Work respectfully with others and show value for individual contributions.

6.4

The student will read and determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.
  1. Identify word origins and derivations.
  2. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.
  3. Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.
  4. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of figurative language.
  5. Use word-reference materials.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

7.1

The student will participate in and contribute to conversations, group discussions, and oral presentations.
  1. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using agreed upon discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  2. Clearly communicate ideas and information orally in an organized and succinct manner.
  3. Ask probing questions to seek elaboration and clarification of ideas.
  4. Participate in collaborative discussions with partners building on others’ ideas.
  5. Make statements to communicate agreement or tactful disagreement with others’ ideas.
  6. Use language and style appropriate to audience, topic, and purpose.
  7. Give formal and informal presentations in a group or individually, providing evidence to support a main idea.
  8. Work effectively and respectfully within diverse groups.
  9. Exhibit willingness to make necessary compromises to accomplish a goal.
  10. Share responsibility for collaborative work.

7.4

The student will read and determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.
  1. Identify word origins and derivations.
  2. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.
  3. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of figurative language.
  4. Identify connotations.
  5. Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.
  6. Use word-reference materials to determine meanings and etymology.
  7. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

8.1

The student will participate in, collaborate in, and report on small-group learning activities.
  1. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks and share responsibility for collaborative work within diverse teams.
  2. Exhibit willingness to make necessary compromises to accomplish a goal.
  3. Collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems.
  4. Include all group members, and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  5. Make statements to communicate agreement or tactful disagreement with others’ ideas.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Use self-reflection to evaluate one’s own role in preparation and participation in small-group activities.

8.4

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development within authentic texts.
  1. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of an author’s use of figurative language.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meaning and differentiate among multiple meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to determine the meaning(s) of unfamiliar words and technical vocabulary.
  4. Identify the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Use word-reference materials to determine meanings and etymology.
  6. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  7. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

9.1

The student will participate in, collaborate in, and make multimodal presentations both independently and in small groups.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  4. Assist with setting rules for group work including informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views and goal setting.
  5. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  6. Share responsibility for collaborative work.
  7. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  8. Include all group members, acknowledge new information expressed by others, and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  9. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  10. Evaluate impact, purpose, point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric of presentation(s).
  11. Use self-reflection to evaluate one’s own role in preparation and participation in small-group activities.

9.5

The student will read and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to understand, analyze, and gain meaning from texts.
  2. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  3. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, and impact.
  4. Recognize an author’s intended purpose for writing and identify the main idea.
  5. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  6. Identify characteristics of expository, technical, and persuasive texts.
  7. Identify a position/argument to be confirmed, disproved, or modified.
  8. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information.
  9. Analyze, organize, and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, complete a task, or create a product.
  10. Differentiate between fact and opinion and evaluate their impact.
  11. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  12. Use the reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

10.1

The student will make planned multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Make strategic use of multimodal tools.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work effectively with diverse teams including setting rules and goals for group work such as coming to informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, and presenting alternate views.
  4. Assume responsibility for specific group tasks.
  5. Include all group members and value individual contributions made by each group member.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  8. Choose vocabulary, language, and tone appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Access, critically evaluate, and use information accurately to solve problems.
  10. Use reflection to evaluate one’s own role and the group process in small-group activities.
  11. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, use of evidence, rhetoric, and identify any faulty reasoning.

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.1

The student will make planned informative and persuasive multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Respond thoughtfully and tactfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement.
  5. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  6. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  7. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  8. Use vocabulary appropriate to the topic, audience, and purpose.
  9. Evaluate effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.1

The student will make planned persuasive/argumentative, multimodal, interactive presentations collaboratively and individually.
  1. Select and effectively use multimodal tools to design and develop presentation content.
  2. Credit information sources.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with diverse teams.
  4. Anticipate and address alternative or opposing perspectives and counterclaims.
  5. Evaluate the various techniques used to construct arguments in multimodal presentations.
  6. Use a variety of strategies to listen actively and speak using appropriate discussion rules with awareness of verbal and nonverbal cues.
  7. Critique effectiveness of multimodal presentations.

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

CE.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting evidence from primary and secondary sources, including charts, graphs, and political cartoons;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. analyzing information to create diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, and spreadsheets;
  4. determining the accuracy and validity of information by separating fact and opinion and recognizing bias;
  5. constructing informed, evidence-based arguments from multiple sources;
  6. determining multiple cause-and-effect relationships that impact political and economic events;
  7. taking informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the costs and benefits of a specific choice;
  9. applying civic virtue and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. defending conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from sources.

CE.4

The student will demonstrate personal character traits that facilitate thoughtful and effective participation in civic life by

  1. practicing trustworthiness and honesty;
  2. practicing courtesy and respect for the rights of others;
  3. practicing responsibility, accountability, and self-reliance;
  4. practicing respect for the law;
  5. practicing patriotism;
  6. practicing thoughtful decision making; and
  7. practicing service to the school and/or local community.

CE.12

The student will apply social science skills to understand the United States economy by

  1. describing the characteristics of the United States economy, including limited government, private property, profit, markets, consumer sovereignty, and competition;
  2. describing how in a market economy supply and demand determine prices;
  3. describing the types of business organizations and the role of entrepreneurship;
  4. explaining the circular flow that shows how consumers (households), businesses (producers), and markets interact;
  5. explaining how financial institutions channel funds from savers to borrowers; and
  6. analyzing the relationship of Virginia and the United States to the global economy, with emphasis on the impact of technological innovations.

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

USI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship, by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify the costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

USII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

Other Related Standards

Instructional Resources for Workplace Readiness Skills

Big-Picture Thinking Resources