# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Technology Task 1378753477

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Identify the six simple machines.

Definition

Identification should include
  • wheel and axle
  • inclined plane
  • wedge
  • screw
  • pulley
  • lever.
  Identification should include citing examples, which could include
  • windmill, fan (wheel and axle)
  • roller coaster, stairs (inclined plane)
  • sledge hammer, chisels (wedge)
  • door lock, drill (screw)
  • flag pole, window blinds (pulley)
  • seesaw, rake (lever).

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are some examples of simple machines that you have used?
  • How does a simple machine relate to a compound machine (e.g., bicycle)?
  • What are some examples of each type of machine?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

7.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features including type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  3. Make inferences and draw logical conclusions using explicit and implied textual evidence.
  4. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  5. Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of texts.
  6. Describe how word choice and language structure convey an author’s viewpoint.
  7. Identify the main idea.
  8. Summarize text identifying supporting details.
  9. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Organize and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  2. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to analyze selections.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview or locate information.
  4. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  5. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, word choice, and impact.
  6. Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  7. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  8. Identify the main idea.
  9. Summarize the text identifying supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

History and Social Science

USII.2

The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables for
  1. explaining how physical features and climate influenced the movement of people westward;
  2. explaining relationships among natural resources, transportation, and industrial development after 1865; and
  3. locating the 50 states and the cities most significant to the development of the United States and explaining what makes those cities significant.

Science

PS.10

The student will investigate and understand scientific principles of work, force, and motion. Key concepts include
  1. speed, velocity, and acceleration;
  2. Newton’s laws of motion;
  3. work, force, mechanical advantage, efficiency, and power; and
  4. technological applications of work, force, and motion.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

Assess the Impact of Products and Systems

 

Engineering Design

 

The Core Concepts of Technology

 

Use and Maintain Technological Products and Systems

  

TSA Competitive Events

Tech Bowl