# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Technology Task 541245447

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe the architecture and construction area of technology.

Definition

Description should include the processes used in designing and constructing structures such as houses, commercial buildings, agricultural facilities, roads, and bridges.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are some examples of structures?
  • What is an example of a temporary structure? A permanent structure?
  • Why is the proper order of construction processes/steps important?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

7.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features including type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  3. Make inferences and draw logical conclusions using explicit and implied textual evidence.
  4. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  5. Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of texts.
  6. Describe how word choice and language structure convey an author’s viewpoint.
  7. Identify the main idea.
  8. Summarize text identifying supporting details.
  9. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Organize and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  2. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to analyze selections.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview or locate information.
  4. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  5. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, word choice, and impact.
  6. Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  7. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  8. Identify the main idea.
  9. Summarize the text identifying supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

History and Social Science

USI.2

The student will interpret maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables to

  1. locate the seven continents and five oceans;
  2. locate and describe major geographic regions of North America: Coastal Plain, Appalachian Mountains, Canadian Shield, Interior Lowlands, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, Basin and Range, and Coastal Range;
  3. locate major water features and explain their importance to the early history of the United States: Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico; and
  4. recognize key geographic features on maps, diagrams, and/or photographs.

USI.5

The student will apply social science skills to understand the factors that shaped colonial America by

  1. describing the religious and economic events and conditions that led to the colonization of America;
  2. describing life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies, with emphasis on how people interacted with their environment to produce goods and services;
  3. describing specialization of and interdependence among New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies;
  4. describing colonial life in America from the perspectives of large landowners, farmers, artisans, merchants, women, free African Americans, indentured servants, and enslaved African Americans; and
  5. explaining the political and economic relationships between the colonies and Great Britain.

USI.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

  1. describing territorial expansion and how it affected the political map of the United States, with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California;
  2. explaining how geographic and economic factors influenced the westward movement of settlers;
  3. explaining the impact of westward expansion on American Indians;
  4. describing the impact of inventions, including the cotton gin, the reaper, the steamboat, and the steam locomotive, on life in America; and
  5. explaining the main ideas of the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements.

USII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by

  1. describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan after World War II, the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as superpowers, and the establishment of the United Nations;
  2. describing the conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy;
  3. examining the role of the United States in defending freedom during the Cold War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam, the Cuban missile crisis, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the rise of new challenges;
  4. describing the changing patterns of society, including expanded educational and economic opportunities for military veterans, women, and minorities; and
  5. evaluating and explaining the impact of international trade and globalization on American life.

USII.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries by

  1. examining the impact of the Civil Rights Movement, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the changing role of women on all Americans;
  2. describing the development of new technologies in communication, entertainment, and business and their impact on American life;
  3. analyzing how representative citizens have influenced America scientifically, culturally, academically, and economically; and
  4. evaluating and explaining American foreign policy, immigration, the global environment, and other emerging issues.

Mathematics

6.7

The student will
  1. derive π (pi);
  2. solve problems, including practical problems, involving circumference and area of a circle; and
  3. solve problems, including practical problems, involving area and perimeter of triangles and rectangles.

7.4

The student will
  1. describe and determine the volume and surface area of rectangular prisms and cylinders; and
  2. solve problems, including practical problems, involving the volume and surface area of rectangular prisms and cylinders.

7.5

The student will solve problems, including practical problems, involving the relationship between corresponding sides and corresponding angles of similar quadrilaterals and triangles.

7.6

The student will
  1. compare and contrast quadrilaterals based on their properties; and
  2. determine unknown side lengths or angle measures of quadrilaterals.

8.6

The student will
  1. solve problems, including practical problems, involving volume and surface area of cones and square-based pyramids; and
  2. describe how changing one measured attribute of a rectangular prism affects the volume and surface area.

8.8

The student will construct a three-dimensional model, given the top or bottom, side, and front views.

8.9

The student will
  1. verify the Pythagorean Theorem; and
  2. apply the Pythagorean Theorem.

8.10

The student will solve area and perimeter problems, including practical problems, involving composite plane figures.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

Construction Technologies

 

Engineering Design

 

The Attributes of Design

 

The Role of Troubleshooting, Research and Development, Invention and Innovation, and Experimentation in Problem Solving

 

Use and Maintain Technological Products and Systems

  

TSA Competitive Events

Construction Challenge

 

Tech Bowl