# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Technology Task 1446406905

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Demonstrate proficiency with technologies, tools, and machines common to a specific occupation.

Definition

Demonstration includes selecting and using technology, tools, and machines to accomplish work.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What technology, tools, or machines are common in a given industry?
  • How are technology, tools, or machines used to accomplish job tasks efficiently?
  • Why is it important to be proficient with industry-specific technology, tools, and machines?

Related Standards of Learning

History and Social Science

CE.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting evidence from primary and secondary sources, including charts, graphs, and political cartoons;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. analyzing information to create diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, and spreadsheets;
  4. determining the accuracy and validity of information by separating fact and opinion and recognizing bias;
  5. constructing informed, evidence-based arguments from multiple sources;
  6. determining multiple cause-and-effect relationships that impact political and economic events;
  7. taking informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the costs and benefits of a specific choice;
  9. applying civic virtue and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. defending conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from sources.

CE.4

The student will demonstrate personal character traits that facilitate thoughtful and effective participation in civic life by

  1. practicing trustworthiness and honesty;
  2. practicing courtesy and respect for the rights of others;
  3. practicing responsibility, accountability, and self-reliance;
  4. practicing respect for the law;
  5. practicing patriotism;
  6. practicing thoughtful decision making; and
  7. practicing service to the school and/or local community.

CE.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand personal finance and career opportunities by

  1. identifying talents, interests, and aspirations that influence career choice;
  2. identifying human capital such as attitudes and behaviors that strengthen the individual work ethic and promote career success;
  3. identifying human capital such as abilities, skills, and education and the changing supply of and demand for them in the economy;
  4. examining the impact of technological change and globalization on career opportunities;
  5. describing the importance of education to lifelong personal finances; and
  6. analyzing the financial responsibilities of citizenship, including evaluating common forms of credit, savings, investments, purchases, contractual agreements, warranties, and guarantees.

GOVT.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. planning inquiries by synthesizing information from diverse primary and secondary sources;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  4. evaluating critically the quality, accuracy, and validity of information to determine misconceptions, fact and opinion, and bias;
  5. constructing informed, analytic arguments using evidence from multiple sources to introduce and support substantive and significant claims;
  6. explaining how cause-and-effect relationships impact political and economic events;
  7. taking knowledgeable, constructive action, individually and collaboratively, to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze the costs and benefits of a specific choice, considering incentives and possible consequences;
  9. applying civic virtues and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. communicating conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from multiple sources and citing specific sources.

USI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship, by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify the costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

USII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

VUS.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in Virginia and United States history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in Virginia and United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in Virginia and United States history;
  4. constructing arguments, using evidence from multiple sources;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in Virginia and United States history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impact people, places, and events in Virginia and United States history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and ethical use of material and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WHII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about events and life in world history;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends in world history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in world history;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives in world history;
  6. explaining how indirect cause-and-effect relationships impacted people, places, and events in world history;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizens and ethical use of materials and intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

Mathematics

6.10

The student, given a practical situation, will
  1. represent data in a circle graph;
  2. make observations and inferences about data represented in a circle graph; and
  3. compare circle graphs with the same data represented in bar graphs, pictographs, and line plots.

6.11

The student will
  1. represent the mean of a data set graphically as the balance point; and
  2. determine the impact on measures of center when a single value of a data set is added, removed, or changed.

7.9

The student, given data in a practical situation, will
  1. represent data in a histogram;
  2. make observations and inferences about data represented in a histogram; and
  3. compare histograms with the same data represented in stem-and-leaf plots, line plots, and circle graphs.

8.4

The student will solve practical problems involving consumer applications.

A.7

The student will investigate and analyze function (linear and quadratic) families and their characteristics both algebraically and graphically, including
  1. determining whether a relation is a function;
  2. domain and range;
  3. zeros of a function;
  4. x- and y-intercepts;
  5. finding the values of a function for elements in its domain; and
  6. making connections between and among multiple representations of functions including concrete, verbal, numeric, graphic, and algebraic.

A.8

The student, given a situation in a real-world context, will analyze a relation to determine whether a direct or inverse variation exists, and represent a direct variation algebraically and graphically and an inverse variation algebraically.

A.9

The student will collect and analyze data, determine the equation of the curve of best fit in order to make predictions, and solve practical problems, using mathematical models of linear and quadratic functions.

AFDA.1

The student will investigate and analyze linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic function families and their characteristics. Key concepts include
  1. domain and range;
  2. intervals in which the function is increasing or decreasing;
  3. absolute maxima and minima;
  4. zeros;
  5. intercepts;
  6. values of a function for elements in its domain;
  7. connections between and among multiple representations of functions using verbal descriptions, tables, equations, and graphs;
  8. end behavior; and
  9. vertical and horizontal asymptotes.

AFDA.3

The student will collect and analyze data, determine the equation of the curve of best fit in order to make predictions, and solve practical problems using models of linear, quadratic, and exponential functions.

AFDA.5

The student will determine optimal values in problem situations by identifying constraints and using linear programming techniques.

AII.4

The student will solve systems of linear-quadratic and quadratic-quadratic equations, algebraically and graphically.

AII.7

The student will investigate and analyze linear, quadratic, absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic function families algebraically and graphically. Key concepts include
  1. domain, range, and continuity;
  2. intervals in which a function is increasing or decreasing;
  3. extrema;
  4. zeros;
  5. intercepts;
  6. values of a function for elements in its domain;
  7. connections between and among multiple representations of functions using verbal descriptions, tables, equations, and graphs;
  8. end behavior;
  9. vertical and horizontal asymptotes;
  10. inverse of a function; and
  11. composition of functions algebraically and graphically.

AII.9

The student will collect and analyze data, determine the equation of the curve of best fit in order to make predictions, and solve practical problems, using mathematical models of linear, quadratic, and exponential functions.

COM.1

The student will design and apply computer programs to solve practical problems in mathematics arising from business and applications in mathematics.

COM.7

The student will select and call library functions to process data, as appropriate.

COM.10

The student will design and implement the input phase of a program, which will include designing screen layout, getting information into the program by way of user interaction and/or file input, and validating input.

COM.11

The student will design and implement the output phase of a computer program, which will include designing output layout, accessing available output devices, using output statements, and labeling results.

COM.12

The student will design and implement computer graphics to enhance output.

COM.16

The student will describe the way the computer stores, accesses, and processes variables, including the following topics: the use of variables versus constants, parameter passing, scope of variables, and local versus global variables.

Science

CH.1

The student will investigate and understand that experiments in which variables are measured, analyzed, and evaluated produce observations and verifiable data. Key concepts include
  1. designated laboratory techniques;
  2. safe use of chemicals and equipment;
  3. proper response to emergency situations;
  4. manipulation of multiple variables, using repeated trials;
  5. accurate recording, organization, and analysis of data through repeated trials;
  6. mathematical and procedural error analysis;
  7. mathematical manipulations including SI units, scientific notation, linear equations, graphing, ratio and proportion, significant digits, and dimensional analysis;
  8. use of appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware for gathering data, communicating results, and using simulations to model concepts;
  9. construction and defense of a scientific viewpoint; and
  10. the use of current applications to reinforce chemistry concepts.

ES.1

The student will plan and conduct investigations in which
  1. volume, area, mass, elapsed time, direction, temperature, pressure, distance, density, and changes in elevation/depth are calculated utilizing the most appropriate tools;
  2. technologies including computers, probeware, and geospatial technologies are used to collect, analyze, and report data and to demonstrate concepts and simulate experimental conditions;
  3. scales, diagrams, charts, graphs, tables, imagery, models, and profiles are constructed and interpreted;
  4. maps and globes are read and interpreted, including location by latitude and longitude;
  5. variables are manipulated with repeated trials; and
  6. current applications are used to reinforce Earth science concepts.

LS.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. data are organized into tables showing repeated trials and means;
  2. a classification system is developed based on multiple attributes;
  3. triple beam and electronic balances, thermometers, metric rulers, graduated cylinders, and probeware are used to gather data;
  4. models and simulations are constructed and used to illustrate and explain phenomena;
  5. sources of experimental error are identified;
  6. dependent variables, independent variables, and constants are identified;
  7. variables are controlled to test hypotheses, and trials are repeated;
  8. data are organized, communicated through graphical representation, interpreted, and used to make predictions;
  9. patterns are identified in data and are interpreted and evaluated; and
  10. current applications are used to reinforce life science concepts.

PH.1

The student will plan and conduct investigations using experimental design and product design processes. Key concepts include
  1. the components of a system are defined;
  2. instruments are selected and used to extend observations and measurements;
  3. information is recorded and presented in an organized format;
  4. the limitations of the experimental apparatus and design are recognized;
  5. the limitations of measured quantities are recognized through the appropriate use of significant figures or error ranges;
  6. models and simulations are used to visualize and explain phenomena, to make predictions from hypotheses, and to interpret data; and
  7. appropriate technology including computers, graphing calculators, and probeware is used for gathering and analyzing data and communicating results.

PS.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. chemicals and equipment are used safely;
  2. length, mass, volume, density, temperature, weight, and force are accurately measured;
  3. conversions are made among metric units, applying appropriate prefixes;
  4. triple beam and electronic balances, thermometers, metric rulers, graduated cylinders, probeware, and spring scales are used to gather data;
  5. numbers are expressed in scientific notation where appropriate;
  6. independent and dependent variables, constants, controls, and repeated trials are identified;
  7. data tables showing the independent and dependent variables, derived quantities, and the number of trials are constructed and interpreted;
  8. data tables for descriptive statistics showing specific measures of central tendency, the range of the data set, and the number of repeated trials are constructed and interpreted;
  9. frequency distributions, scatterplots, line plots, and histograms are constructed and interpreted;
  10. valid conclusions are made after analyzing data;
  11. research methods are used to investigate practical problems and questions;
  12. experimental results are presented in appropriate written form; and
  13. models and simulations are constructed and used to illustrate and explain phenomena;
  14. current applications of physical science concepts are used.

Other Related Standards

Instructional Resources for Workplace Readiness Skills

Technologies, Tools, and Machines Common to a Specific Occupation: Resources