# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Inventions and Innovations Task 850058735

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Explain the importance of technology in the development of society.

Definition

Explanation should include the difference between an invention and an innovation, what impact the various inventions and innovations have had on society, and evaluating the consequences of technology.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What is the definition of technology?
  • Is technology good or bad?
  • How is an invention different from an innovation?
  • What are some famous inventions?
  • What are the desirable and undesirable impacts of an invention or an innovation?
  • What are expected and unexpected consequences of an invention or an innovation?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

7.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features including type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  3. Make inferences and draw logical conclusions using explicit and implied textual evidence.
  4. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  5. Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of texts.
  6. Describe how word choice and language structure convey an author’s viewpoint.
  7. Identify the main idea.
  8. Summarize text identifying supporting details.
  9. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Organize and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  2. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to analyze selections.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview or locate information.
  4. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  5. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, word choice, and impact.
  6. Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  7. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  8. Identify the main idea.
  9. Summarize the text identifying supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

History and Social Science

CE.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the American constitutional government at the local level by
  1. describing the structure and powers of the local government;
  2. explaining the relationship of local government to the state government; and
  3. explaining and/or simulating the lawmaking process.

CE.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the judicial systems established by the Constitution of Virginia and the Constitution of the United States by

  1. describing the organization of the United States judicial system as consisting of state and federal courts with original and appellate jurisdiction;
  2. describing the exercise of judicial review;
  3. comparing and contrasting civil and criminal cases; and
  4. explaining how due process protections seek to ensure justice.

CE.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand of how economic decisions are made in the marketplace by

  1. explaining that because of scarcity, consumers, producers, and governments must make choices, understanding that everyone’s choice has an opportunity cost; and
  2. comparing and contrasting how traditional, free market, command, and mixed economies decide how to allocate their limited resources.

USI.2

The student will interpret maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables to

  1. locate the seven continents and five oceans;
  2. locate and describe major geographic regions of North America: Coastal Plain, Appalachian Mountains, Canadian Shield, Interior Lowlands, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, Basin and Range, and Coastal Range;
  3. locate major water features and explain their importance to the early history of the United States: Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico; and
  4. recognize key geographic features on maps, diagrams, and/or photographs.

USI.4

The student will apply social science skills to understand European exploration in North America and West Africa by

  1. describing the motivations for, obstacles to, and accomplishments of the Spanish, French, Portuguese, and English explorations;
  2. describing cultural and economic interactions between Europeans and American Indians that led to cooperation and conflict, with emphasis on the American Indian and European concept of land; and
  3. identifying the locations and describing the characteristics of West African societies (Ghana, Mali, and Songhai) and their interactions with traders.

USI.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

  1. describing territorial expansion and how it affected the political map of the United States, with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California;
  2. explaining how geographic and economic factors influenced the westward movement of settlers;
  3. explaining the impact of westward expansion on American Indians;
  4. describing the impact of inventions, including the cotton gin, the reaper, the steamboat, and the steam locomotive, on life in America; and
  5. explaining the main ideas of the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements.

Science

6.8

The student will investigate and understand the organization of the solar system and the interactions among the various bodies that comprise it. Key concepts include
  1. the sun, moon, Earth, other planets and their moons, dwarf planets, meteors, asteroids, and comets;
  2. relative sizes of and distance between planets;
  3. the role of gravity;
  4. revolution and rotation;
  5. the mechanics of day and night and the phases of the moon;
  6. the unique properties of Earth as a planet;
  7. the relationship of the Earth’s tilt and the seasons;
  8. the cause of tides; and
  9. the history and technology of space exploration.

LS.11

The student will investigate and understand the relationships between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Key concepts include
  1. food production and harvest;
  2. change in habitat size, quality, or structure;
  3. change in species competition;
  4. population disturbances and factors that threaten or enhance species survival; and
  5. environmental issues.

LS.12

The student will investigate and understand that organisms reproduce and transmit genetic information to new generations. Key concepts include
  1. the structure and role of DNA;
  2. the function of genes and chromosomes;
  3. genotypes and phenotypes;
  4. characteristics that can and cannot be inherited;
  5. genetic engineering and its applications; and
  6. historical contributions and significance of discoveries related to genetics.

PS.8d

technological applications of sound.

PS.9e

technological applications of light.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

1. The Characteristics and Scope of Technology

 

2. The Core Concepts of Technology

 

3. The Relationships Among Technologies and the Connections Between Technology and Other Fields

 

4. The Cultural, Social, Economic, and Political Effects of Technology

 

5. The Effects of Technology on the Environment

 

6. The Role of Society in the Development and Use of Technology

 

7. The Influence of Technology on History

 

TSA Competitive Events

Challenging Technology Issues

 

Essays on Technology

 

Inventions and Innovations

 

Prepared Speech