# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Inventions and Innovations Task 1247822289

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe the engineering design process.

Definition

Description should include the following steps of the engineering design process, with emphasis on defining problems and brainstorming solutions:
  • Define the problem
  • Research
  • Brainstorm
  • Choose the best solution and design
  • Build/create
  • Test and evaluate
  • Redesign/rebuild
  • Communicate results

Process/Skill Questions

  • What process do designs go through before a product is produced?
  • Why should a group brainstorm ideas to solve a problem or invent something?
  • When in the process does feedback occur?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.4

The student will read and determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.
  1. Identify word origins and derivations.
  2. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.
  3. Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.
  4. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of figurative language.
  5. Use word-reference materials.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

7.4

The student will read and determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.
  1. Identify word origins and derivations.
  2. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.
  3. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of figurative language.
  4. Identify connotations.
  5. Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.
  6. Use word-reference materials to determine meanings and etymology.
  7. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

7.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features including type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  3. Make inferences and draw logical conclusions using explicit and implied textual evidence.
  4. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  5. Identify the source, viewpoint, and purpose of texts.
  6. Describe how word choice and language structure convey an author’s viewpoint.
  7. Identify the main idea.
  8. Summarize text identifying supporting details.
  9. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Organize and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

8.4

The student will apply knowledge of word origins, and figurative language to extend vocabulary development within authentic texts.
  1. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of an author’s use of figurative language.
  2. Use context, structure, and connotations to determine meaning and differentiate among multiple meanings of words and phrases.
  3. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to determine the meaning(s) of unfamiliar words and technical vocabulary.
  4. Identify the meaning of common idioms.
  5. Use word-reference materials to determine meanings and etymology.
  6. Discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotation.
  7. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

8.6

The student will read, comprehend, and analyze a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Identify an author’s organizational pattern using textual clues, such as transitional words and phrases.
  2. Apply knowledge of text features and organizational patterns to analyze selections.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview or locate information.
  4. Make inferences and draw conclusions based on explicit and implied information using evidence from text as support.
  5. Analyze the author’s qualifications, viewpoint, word choice, and impact.
  6. Analyze details for relevance and accuracy.
  7. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  8. Identify the main idea.
  9. Summarize the text identifying supporting details.
  10. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  11. Evaluate, organize, and synthesize information for use in written and other formats.
  12. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  13. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

History and Social Science

CE.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting evidence from primary and secondary sources, including charts, graphs, and political cartoons;
  2. analyzing how political and economic trends influence public policy, using demographic information and other data sources;
  3. analyzing information to create diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, and spreadsheets;
  4. determining the accuracy and validity of information by separating fact and opinion and recognizing bias;
  5. constructing informed, evidence-based arguments from multiple sources;
  6. determining multiple cause-and-effect relationships that impact political and economic events;
  7. taking informed action to address school, community, local, state, national, and global issues;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the costs and benefits of a specific choice;
  9. applying civic virtue and democratic principles to make collaborative decisions; and
  10. defending conclusions orally and in writing to a wide range of audiences, using evidence from sources.

USII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

WG.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. synthesizing evidence from artifacts and primary and secondary sources to obtain information about the world’s countries, cities, and environments;
  2. using geographic information to determine patterns and trends to understand world regions;
  3. creating, comparing, and interpreting maps, charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of world regions;
  4. evaluating sources for accuracy, credibility, bias, and propaganda;
  5. using maps and other visual images to compare and contrast historical, cultural, economic, and political perspectives;
  6. explaining indirect cause-and-effect relationships to understand geospatial connections;
  7. analyzing multiple connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to analyze and explain the incentives for and consequences of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

Mathematics

6.5

The student will
  1. multiply and divide fractions and mixed numbers;
  2. solve single-step and multistep practical problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of fractions and mixed numbers; and
  3. solve multistep practical problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals.

6.6

  1. add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers;
  2. solve practical problems involving operations with integers; and
  3. simplify numerical expressions involving integers.

7.2

The student will solve practical problems involving operations with rational numbers.

7.3

The student will solve single-step and multistep practical problems, using proportional reasoning.

7.4

The student will
  1. describe and determine the volume and surface area of rectangular prisms and cylinders; and
  2. solve problems, including practical problems, involving the volume and surface area of rectangular prisms and cylinders.

8.4

The student will solve practical problems involving consumer applications.

8.6

The student will
  1. solve problems, including practical problems, involving volume and surface area of cones and square-based pyramids; and
  2. describe how changing one measured attribute of a rectangular prism affects the volume and surface area.

8.9

The student will
  1. verify the Pythagorean Theorem; and
  2. apply the Pythagorean Theorem.

8.10

The student will solve area and perimeter problems, including practical problems, involving composite plane figures.

8.12

The student will
  1. represent numerical data in boxplots;
  2. make observations and inferences about data represented in boxplots; and
  3. compare and analyze two data sets using boxplots.

8.14

The student will
  1. evaluate an algebraic expression for given replacement values of the variables; and
  2. simplify algebraic expressions in one variable.

Science

6.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. observations are made involving fine discrimination between similar objects and organisms;
  2. precise and approximate measurements are recorded;
  3. scale models are used to estimate distance, volume, and quantity;
  4. hypotheses are stated in ways that identify the independent and dependent variables;
  5. a method is devised to test the validity of predictions and inferences;
  6. one variable is manipulated over time, using many repeated trials;
  7. data are collected, recorded, analyzed, and reported using metric measurements and tools;
  8. data are analyzed and communicated through graphical representation;
  9. models and simulations are designed and used to illustrate and explain phenomena and systems; and
  10. current applications are used to reinforce science concepts.

LS.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. data are organized into tables showing repeated trials and means;
  2. a classification system is developed based on multiple attributes;
  3. triple beam and electronic balances, thermometers, metric rulers, graduated cylinders, and probeware are used to gather data;
  4. models and simulations are constructed and used to illustrate and explain phenomena;
  5. sources of experimental error are identified;
  6. dependent variables, independent variables, and constants are identified;
  7. variables are controlled to test hypotheses, and trials are repeated;
  8. data are organized, communicated through graphical representation, interpreted, and used to make predictions;
  9. patterns are identified in data and are interpreted and evaluated; and
  10. current applications are used to reinforce life science concepts.

PS.1

The student will demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning, logic, and the nature of science by planning and conducting investigations in which
  1. chemicals and equipment are used safely;
  2. length, mass, volume, density, temperature, weight, and force are accurately measured;
  3. conversions are made among metric units, applying appropriate prefixes;
  4. triple beam and electronic balances, thermometers, metric rulers, graduated cylinders, probeware, and spring scales are used to gather data;
  5. numbers are expressed in scientific notation where appropriate;
  6. independent and dependent variables, constants, controls, and repeated trials are identified;
  7. data tables showing the independent and dependent variables, derived quantities, and the number of trials are constructed and interpreted;
  8. data tables for descriptive statistics showing specific measures of central tendency, the range of the data set, and the number of repeated trials are constructed and interpreted;
  9. frequency distributions, scatterplots, line plots, and histograms are constructed and interpreted;
  10. valid conclusions are made after analyzing data;
  11. research methods are used to investigate practical problems and questions;
  12. experimental results are presented in appropriate written form; and
  13. models and simulations are constructed and used to illustrate and explain phenomena;
  14. current applications of physical science concepts are used.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

1. The Characteristics and Scope of Technology

 

10. The Role of Troubleshooting, Research and Development, Invention and Innovation, and Experimentation in Problem Solving

 

2. The Core Concepts of Technology

 

8. The Attributes of Design

 

TSA Competitive Events

Biotechnology

 

Construction Challenge

 

Dragster

 

Flight

 

Mass Production

 

Problem Solving

 

Structural Engineering

 

System Control Technology