# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Technological Systems Task 289843492

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Analyze systems of the designed world, using the Universal Systems Model.

Definition

Analysis should include using the systems model to analyze areas of the designed world that include

  • information and communication
  • manufacturing
  • construction
  • transportation
  • energy and power
  • agricultural and biotechnology
  • medical technology.

Process/Skill Questions

  • Why do we analyze technological systems?
  • How does the systems model (input, process, output, feedback) help us evaluate technological systems?
  • How do innovations come from analyzing technological systems?
  • How will knowledge in other fields of study aid in technological advancement?
  • What is a subsystem? What are some examples of subsystems?

Related Standards of Learning

History and Social Science

USI.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship, by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify the costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

USI.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

  1. describing territorial expansion and how it affected the political map of the United States, with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California;
  2. explaining how geographic and economic factors influenced the westward movement of settlers;
  3. explaining the impact of westward expansion on American Indians;
  4. describing the impact of inventions, including the cotton gin, the reaper, the steamboat, and the steam locomotive, on life in America; and
  5. explaining the main ideas of the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements.

USII.1

The student will demonstrate skills for historical thinking, geographical analysis, economic decision making, and responsible citizenship by

  1. analyzing and interpreting artifacts and primary and secondary sources to understand events in United States history;
  2. analyzing and interpreting geographic information to determine patterns and trends in United States history;
  3. interpreting charts, graphs, and pictures to determine characteristics of people, places, or events in United States history;
  4. using evidence to draw conclusions and make generalizations;
  5. comparing and contrasting historical, cultural, and political perspectives in United States history;
  6. determining relationships with multiple causes or effects in United States history;
  7. explaining connections across time and place;
  8. using a decision-making model to identify costs and benefits of a specific choice made;
  9. identifying the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the ethical use of material or intellectual property; and
  10. investigating and researching to develop products orally and in writing.

USII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by

  1. describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan after World War II, the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as superpowers, and the establishment of the United Nations;
  2. describing the conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy;
  3. examining the role of the United States in defending freedom during the Cold War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam, the Cuban missile crisis, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the rise of new challenges;
  4. describing the changing patterns of society, including expanded educational and economic opportunities for military veterans, women, and minorities; and
  5. evaluating and explaining the impact of international trade and globalization on American life.

USII.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the key domestic and international issues during the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries by

  1. examining the impact of the Civil Rights Movement, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the changing role of women on all Americans;
  2. describing the development of new technologies in communication, entertainment, and business and their impact on American life;
  3. analyzing how representative citizens have influenced America scientifically, culturally, academically, and economically; and
  4. evaluating and explaining American foreign policy, immigration, the global environment, and other emerging issues.

Science

6.2

The student will investigate and understand basic sources of energy, their origins, transformations, and uses. Key concepts include
  1. potential and kinetic energy;
  2. the role of the sun in the formation of most energy sources on Earth;
  3. nonrenewable energy sources;
  4. renewable energy sources; and
  5. energy transformations.

6.9

The student will investigate and understand public policy decisions relating to the environment. Key concepts include
  1. management of renewable resources;
  2. management of nonrenewable resources;
  3. the mitigation of land-use and environmental hazards through preventive measures; and
  4. cost/benefit tradeoffs in conservation policies.

PS.6

The student will investigate and understand forms of energy and how energy is transferred and transformed. Key concepts include
  1. potential and kinetic energy; and
  2. mechanical, chemical, electrical, thermal, radiant, and nuclear energy;

PS.10

The student will investigate and understand scientific principles of work, force, and motion. Key concepts include
  1. speed, velocity, and acceleration;
  2. Newton’s laws of motion;
  3. work, force, mechanical advantage, efficiency, and power; and
  4. technological applications of work, force, and motion.

Other Related Standards

ITEEA National Standards

2. The Core Concepts of Technology

 

3. The Relationships Among Technologies and the Connections Between Technology and Other Fields

 

TSA Competitive Events

Biotechnology

 

Inventions and Innovations

 

Mass Production

 

Medical Technology