# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Fashion Marketing Task 1411502040

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Describe the influences that economic, demographic, social, political, geographic, and psychological factors have had on fashion.

Definition

Description should include factors such as the women's movement, immigration, American migration, segregation, war and disasters, economic cycles, movies, popular-culture figures, and demographic phenomena such as Generation X.

Process/Skill Questions

  • How did the women's movement impact fashion in the 19th and 20th centuries?
  • How does immigration impact fashion?
  • Who in the entertainment industry has influenced fashion trends? What influences have these persons had on fashion?
  • How did economic and psychological factors influence fashion in the 1920s? During the Great Depression? During World War II?
  • What is the "Hemline Index"?
  • Which current films have impacted the fashion industry through visual effects?
  • How can the film industry force the hand of the fashion industry?

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand civil liberties and civil rights by

  1. examining the Bill of Rights, with emphasis on First Amendment freedoms;
  2. analyzing due process of law expressed in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments;
  3. explaining how the Supreme Court has applied most of the protections of the Bill of Rights to the states through a process of selective incorporation;
  4. investigating and evaluating the balance between individual liberties and the public interest; and
  5. examining how civil liberties and civil rights are protected under the law.

GOVT.15

The student will apply social science skills to understand the role of government in the Virginia and United States economies by

  1. describing the provision of government goods and services that are not readily produced by the market;
  2. describing government’s establishment and maintenance of the rules and institutions in which markets operate, including the establishment and enforcement of property rights, contracts, consumer rights, labor-management relations, environmental protection, and competition in the marketplace;
  3. investigating and describing the types and purposes of taxation that are used by local, state, and federal governments to pay for services provided by the government;
  4. analyzing how Congress can use fiscal policy to stabilize the economy;
  5. describing the effects of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy on price stability, employment, and the economy; and
  6. evaluating the trade-offs in government decisions.

VUS.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, political, and cultural movements and changes in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the factors that led to United States expansion;
  2. evaluating and explaining the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the roles of Thurgood Marshall and Oliver W. Hill, Sr., and how Virginia responded to the decision;
  3. explaining how the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the 1963 March on Washington, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) had an impact on all Americans;
  4. analyzing changes in immigration policy and the impact of increased immigration;
  5. evaluating and explaining the foreign and domestic policies pursued by the American government after the Cold War;
  6. explaining how scientific and technological advances altered American lives; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the changes that occurred in American culture.

VUS.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand political and social conditions in the United States during the early twenty-first century by

  1. assessing the development of and changes in domestic policies, with emphasis on the impact of the role the United States Supreme Court played in defining a constitutional right to privacy, affirming equal rights, and upholding the rule of law;
  2. evaluating and explaining the changes in foreign policies and the role of the United States in a world confronted by international terrorism, with emphasis on the American response to 9/11 (September 11, 2001);
  3. evaluating the evolving and changing role of government, including its role in the American economy; and
  4. explaining scientific and technological changes and evaluating their impact on American culture

WHII.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand global interactions between 1800 to about 1900 by

  1. locating the United States of America, describing its expansion between 1776 and 1900, and assessing its changing role in the world;
  2. locating Latin America, explaining the causes and effects of the revolutions, with emphasis on the contributions of Toussaint L’Ouverture and Simón Bolívar, and identifying the impact of the American and French Revolutions on Latin America;
  3. describing the political and social challenges faced by Latin American nations, with emphasis on the Monroe Doctrine;
  4. assessing the impact of European colonization and imperialism on Asia, Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Australia; and
  5. analyzing the relationship between industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism.

WHII.10

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War I and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining economic and political causes and identifying major leaders of the war, with emphasis on Woodrow Wilson and Kaiser Wilhelm II;
  2. describing the location of major battles and the role of new technologies;
  3. analyzing and explaining the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and the actions of the League of Nations, with emphasis on the mandate system;
  4. citing causes and consequences of the Russian Revolution;
  5. explaining the causes and assessing the impact of worldwide depression in the 1930s; and
  6. examining the rise of totalitarianism.

WHII.11

The student will apply social science skills to understand World War II and its worldwide impact by

  1. explaining the major causes of the war;
  2. describing the leaders of the war, with emphasis on Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall, Winston Churchill, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, and Hirohito;
  3. describing the major events, including major battles and the role of new technologies;
  4. examining the Holocaust and other examples of genocide in the twentieth century; and
  5. examining the effects of the war, with emphasis on the terms of the peace, the war crimes trials, the division of Europe, plans to rebuild Germany and Japan, and the creation of international cooperative organizations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948).

WHII.12

The student will apply social science skills to understand the conflicts during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the causes of the Cold War, including the competition between the American and Soviet economic and political systems and the causes of the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe;
  2. describing the major leaders and events of the Cold War, including the location of major conflicts;
  3. describing conflicts and revolutionary movements in Asia and their major leaders, including Mao Tse-tung (Zedong), Chiang Kai-shek, Deng Xiaoping, and Ho Chi Minh; and
  4. examining the political and economic shifts that led to the end of the Cold War, with emphasis on Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, and Ronald Reagan.

WHII.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand of the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of independence movements and development efforts by

  1. describing the struggles for self-rule, including Gandhi’s leadership in India and the development of India’s democracy;
  2. describing Africa’s independence movements, including Jomo Kenyatta’s leadership of Kenya and Nelson Mandela’s role in South Africa; and
  3. describing the end of the mandate system and the creation of states in the Middle East, including the roles of Golda Meir and Gamal Abdel Nasser.

WHII.14

The student will apply social science skills to understand the global changes during the early twenty-first century by

  1. identifying contemporary political issues, with emphasis on migrations of refugees and others, ethnic/religious conflicts, and the impact of technology, including the role of social media and chemical and biological technologies;
  2. assessing the link between economic and political freedom;
  3. describing economic interdependence, including the rise of multinational corporations, international organizations, and trade agreements; and
  4. analyzing the increasing impact of terrorism.

Other Related Standards

Economics and Personal Finance Standards of Learning

EPF.1

The student will demonstrate knowledge of basic economic concepts and structures by
  1. describing how consumers, businesses, and government decision makers face scarcity of resources and must make trade-offs and incur opportunity costs;
  2. explaining that choices often have long-term unintended consequences;
  3. describing how effective decision making requires comparing the additional costs (marginal costs) and additional benefits (marginal benefits);
  4. identifying factors of production;
  5. comparing the characteristics of market, command, tradition, and mixed economies; and
  6. identifying Adam Smith and describing the characteristics of a market economy.

National MBAResearch Standards-Business Administration

Understand fundamental economic concepts to obtain a foundation for employment in business.