# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Agriscience Task 811804316

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Identify the key factors that have shaped the agricultural industry.

Definition

Identification should include
  • land resources
  • diverse climates
  • dependable transportation systems
  • education
  • marketing opportunities
  • large- and small-scale operations
  • technological advances, innovation, and inventions.

Process/Skill Questions

  • How do land, climate, transportation, and markets affect agricultural production?
  • How has emerging technology affected the field of agriculture?
  • Why is education so important to agriculture today?
  • How has transportation contributed to agriculture's efficiency?
  • What do large-scale farms and small-scale farms have in common? How do they differ?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.5

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fictional texts, literary nonfiction, and poetry.
  1. Identify the elements of narrative structure, including setting, character, plot, conflict, and theme.
  2. Describe cause and effect relationships and their impact on plot.
  3. Explain how an author uses character development to drive conflict and resolution.
  4. Differentiate between first and third person point-of-view.
  5. Describe how word choice and imagery contribute to the meaning of a text.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences using the text for support.
  7. Identify the characteristics of a variety of genres.
  8. Identify and analyze the author’s use of figurative language.
  9. Compare/contrast details in literary and informational nonfiction texts.
  10. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

History and Social Science

USI.2

The student will interpret maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables to

  1. locate the seven continents and five oceans;
  2. locate and describe major geographic regions of North America: Coastal Plain, Appalachian Mountains, Canadian Shield, Interior Lowlands, Great Plains, Rocky Mountains, Basin and Range, and Coastal Range;
  3. locate major water features and explain their importance to the early history of the United States: Great Lakes, Mississippi River, Missouri River, Ohio River, Columbia River, Colorado River, Rio Grande, St. Lawrence River, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, and Gulf of Mexico; and
  4. recognize key geographic features on maps, diagrams, and/or photographs.

USI.5

The student will apply social science skills to understand the factors that shaped colonial America by

  1. describing the religious and economic events and conditions that led to the colonization of America;
  2. describing life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies, with emphasis on how people interacted with their environment to produce goods and services;
  3. describing specialization of and interdependence among New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies;
  4. describing colonial life in America from the perspectives of large landowners, farmers, artisans, merchants, women, free African Americans, indentured servants, and enslaved African Americans; and
  5. explaining the political and economic relationships between the colonies and Great Britain.

USI.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand westward expansion and reform in America from 1801 to 1861 by

  1. describing territorial expansion and how it affected the political map of the United States, with emphasis on the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California;
  2. explaining how geographic and economic factors influenced the westward movement of settlers;
  3. explaining the impact of westward expansion on American Indians;
  4. describing the impact of inventions, including the cotton gin, the reaper, the steamboat, and the steam locomotive, on life in America; and
  5. explaining the main ideas of the abolitionist and women’s suffrage movements.

USII.2

The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables for
  1. explaining how physical features and climate influenced the movement of people westward;
  2. explaining relationships among natural resources, transportation, and industrial development after 1865; and
  3. locating the 50 states and the cities most significant to the development of the United States and explaining what makes those cities significant.

USII.4

The student will apply social science skills to understand how life changed after the Civil War by

  1. examining the reasons for westward expansion, including its impact on American Indians;
  2. explaining the reasons for the increase in immigration, growth of cities, and challenges arising from this expansion;
  3. describing racial segregation, the rise of “Jim Crow,” and other constraints faced by African Americans and other groups in the post-Reconstruction South;
  4. explaining the impact of new inventions, the rise of big business, the growth of industry, and the changes to life on American farms in response to industrialization; and
  5. evaluating and explaining the impact of the Progressive Movement on child labor, working conditions, the rise of organized labor, women’s suffrage, and the temperance movement.

USII.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining how developments in factory and labor productivity, transportation (including the use of the automobile), communication, and rural electrification changed American life and standard of living;
  2. describing the social and economic changes that took place, including prohibition and the Great Migration north and west;
  3. examining art, literature, and music from the 1920s and 1930s, with emphasis on Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, Georgia O’Keeffe, and the Harlem Renaissance; and
  4. analyzing the causes of the Great Depression, its impact on Americans, and the major features of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal.

USII.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand the economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world between the end of World War II and the present by

  1. describing the rebuilding of Europe and Japan after World War II, the emergence of the United States and the Soviet Union as superpowers, and the establishment of the United Nations;
  2. describing the conversion from a wartime to a peacetime economy;
  3. examining the role of the United States in defending freedom during the Cold War, including the wars in Korea and Vietnam, the Cuban missile crisis, the collapse of communism in Europe, and the rise of new challenges;
  4. describing the changing patterns of society, including expanded educational and economic opportunities for military veterans, women, and minorities; and
  5. evaluating and explaining the impact of international trade and globalization on American life.