# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Agriscience Task 811804310

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Explore the vast diversity of agriculture, agriscience, and agribusiness.

Definition

Exploration should include
  • defining agriculture, agriscience, and agribusiness
  • describing ideas associated with agriculture, agriscience, and agribusiness.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What are some local, regional and state agribusinesses?
  • What role does agriscience play in the development of new plant varieties?
  • What are some current trends in agriculture, agriscience, and agribusiness?
  • What are some controversies regarding agribusiness?
  • What effects do agriculture, agribusiness, and agriscience have on our daily lives?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.4

The student will read and determine the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases within authentic texts.
  1. Identify word origins and derivations.
  2. Use roots, affixes, synonyms, and antonyms to expand vocabulary.
  3. Use context and sentence structure to determine meanings and differentiate among multiple meanings of words.
  4. Identify and analyze the construction and impact of figurative language.
  5. Use word-reference materials.
  6. Extend general and cross-curricular vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

6.5

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fictional texts, literary nonfiction, and poetry.
  1. Identify the elements of narrative structure, including setting, character, plot, conflict, and theme.
  2. Describe cause and effect relationships and their impact on plot.
  3. Explain how an author uses character development to drive conflict and resolution.
  4. Differentiate between first and third person point-of-view.
  5. Describe how word choice and imagery contribute to the meaning of a text.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences using the text for support.
  7. Identify the characteristics of a variety of genres.
  8. Identify and analyze the author’s use of figurative language.
  9. Compare/contrast details in literary and informational nonfiction texts.
  10. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

6.8

The student will self- and peer-edit writing for capitalization, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraphing, and Standard English.
  1. Use subject-verb agreement with intervening phrases and clauses.
  2. Use pronoun-antecedent agreement to include indefinite pronouns.
  3. Maintain consistent verb tense across paragraphs.
  4. Eliminate double negatives.
  5. Use quotation marks with dialogue.
  6. Choose adverbs to describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.
  7. Use correct spelling for frequently used words.
  8. Use subordinating and coordinating conjunctions.

History and Social Science

USI.5

The student will apply social science skills to understand the factors that shaped colonial America by

  1. describing the religious and economic events and conditions that led to the colonization of America;
  2. describing life in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies, with emphasis on how people interacted with their environment to produce goods and services;
  3. describing specialization of and interdependence among New England, Mid-Atlantic, and Southern colonies;
  4. describing colonial life in America from the perspectives of large landowners, farmers, artisans, merchants, women, free African Americans, indentured servants, and enslaved African Americans; and
  5. explaining the political and economic relationships between the colonies and Great Britain.

USII.6

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, economic, and technological changes of the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining how developments in factory and labor productivity, transportation (including the use of the automobile), communication, and rural electrification changed American life and standard of living;
  2. describing the social and economic changes that took place, including prohibition and the Great Migration north and west;
  3. examining art, literature, and music from the 1920s and 1930s, with emphasis on Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, Georgia O’Keeffe, and the Harlem Renaissance; and
  4. analyzing the causes of the Great Depression, its impact on Americans, and the major features of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal.