# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Introduction to Agriscience Task 1327927439

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Discuss threats to water quality.

Definition

Discussion should include
  • urban pollution
    • sewage
    • dumps and landfills
    • chemicals used on roads
  • industrial pollution
    • thermal pollution: returning heated water to lakes and rivers disturbs the reproductive instincts of fish and also causes excess algae
    • radioactive waste: passed on to humans through seafood
    • organic waste: sewage requires oxygen for breakdown, so there is less oxygen in the water for fish
    • other contaminants (e.g., drugs, soaps, paints, fertilizers)
  • agricultural pollution
    • disposal of waste and manure
    • pesticide and fertilizer
    • sediment runoff from erosion of topsoil.

Process/Skill Questions

  • What is pollution?
  • How is pollution created?
  • What role do you play in creating and/or minimizing pollution?
  • What are the implications of pollution on your health?
  • Runoff from a parking lot or street would be an example of what type of pollution?
  • What is erosion?
  • What is water pollution?
  • How do industries cause water pollution?
  • What is used in homes that can cause water pollution?
  • How can water pollution impact the food chain?
  • How can polluted water be treated?
  • What are some ways humans negatively impact water quality? What has the biggest negative impact on the quality of water?

Related Standards of Learning

English

6.5

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of fictional texts, literary nonfiction, and poetry.
  1. Identify the elements of narrative structure, including setting, character, plot, conflict, and theme.
  2. Describe cause and effect relationships and their impact on plot.
  3. Explain how an author uses character development to drive conflict and resolution.
  4. Differentiate between first and third person point-of-view.
  5. Describe how word choice and imagery contribute to the meaning of a text.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences using the text for support.
  7. Identify the characteristics of a variety of genres.
  8. Identify and analyze the author’s use of figurative language.
  9. Compare/contrast details in literary and informational nonfiction texts.
  10. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

6.6

The student will read and demonstrate comprehension of a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Skim materials using text features such as type, headings, and graphics to predict and categorize information.
  2. Identify main idea.
  3. Summarize supporting details.
  4. Create an objective summary including main idea and supporting details.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information.
  6. Identify the author’s organizational pattern(s).
  7. Identify transitional words and phrases that signal an author’s organizational pattern.
  8. Differentiate between fact and opinion.
  9. Identify cause and effect relationships.
  10. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  11. Use reading strategies to monitor comprehension throughout the reading process.

History and Social Science

USII.2

The student will use maps, globes, photographs, pictures, or tables for
  1. explaining how physical features and climate influenced the movement of people westward;
  2. explaining relationships among natural resources, transportation, and industrial development after 1865; and
  3. locating the 50 states and the cities most significant to the development of the United States and explaining what makes those cities significant.

Science

ES.8

The student will investigate and understand how freshwater resources are influenced by geologic processes and the activities of humans. Key concepts include
  1. processes of soil development;
  2. development of karst topography;
  3. relationships between groundwater zones, including saturated and unsaturated zones, and the water table;
  4. identification of sources of fresh water, including rivers, springs, and aquifers, with reference to the hydrologic cycle;
  5. dependence on freshwater resources and the effects of human usage on water quality; and
  6. identification of the major watershed systems in Virginia, including the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.