# CTE Resource Center - Verso - Business Law Task 1988004073

CTE Resource Center - Verso

Virginia’s CTE Resource Center

Examine the legal and historical significance of unions and collective bargaining.

Definition

Examination should identify
  • differences between right-to-work and non-right-to-work states
  • strike strategies and implications
  • breach of contract
  • yellow-dog contract
  • ex-parte injunction
  • Sherman Antitrust Act
  • Clayton Antitrust Act.

Related Standards of Learning

English

10.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction texts.
  1. Analyze text features and organizational patterns to evaluate the meaning of texts.
  2. Recognize an author’s intended audience and purpose for writing.
  3. Skim materials to develop an overview and locate information.
  4. Compare and contrast informational texts for intent and content.
  5. Interpret and use data and information in maps, charts, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
  6. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support as evidence.
  7. Analyze and synthesize information in order to solve problems, answer questions, and generate new knowledge.
  8. Analyze ideas within and between selections providing textual evidence.
  9. Summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize ideas, while maintaining meaning and a logical sequence of events, within and between texts.
  10. Use reading strategies throughout the reading process to monitor comprehension.

11.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts including employment documents and technical writing.
  1. Apply information from texts to clarify understanding of concepts.
  2. Read and correctly interpret an application for employment, workplace documents, or an application for college admission.
  3. Analyze technical writing for clarity.
  4. Paraphrase and synthesize ideas within and between texts.
  5. Draw conclusions and make inferences on explicit and implied information using textual support.
  6. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  7. Analyze false premises, claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.
  8. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, sarcasm, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  9. Generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, evaluative, synthesizing, and critical thinking questions about the text(s).

12.5

The student will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of nonfiction texts.
  1. Use critical thinking to generate and respond logically to literal, inferential, and evaluative questions about the text(s).
  2. Identify and synthesize resources to make decisions, complete tasks, and solve specific problems.
  3. Analyze multiple texts addressing the same topic to determine how authors reach similar or different conclusions.
  4. Recognize and analyze use of ambiguity, contradiction, paradox, irony, overstatement, and understatement in text.
  5. Analyze false premises claims, counterclaims, and other evidence in persuasive writing.

History and Social Science

GOVT.9

The student will apply social science skills to understand the process by which public policy is made by

  1. defining public policy and determining how to differentiate public and private action;
  2. examining different perspectives on the role of government;
  3. describing how the national government influences the public agenda and shapes public policy by examining examples such as the Equal Rights Amendment, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 9524 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965;
  4. describing how the state and local governments influence the public agenda and shape public policy;
  5. investigating and evaluating the process by which policy is implemented by the bureaucracy at each level;
  6. analyzing how the incentives of individuals, interest groups, and the media influence public policy; and
  7. devising a course of action to address local and/or state issues.

GOVT.10

The student will apply social science skills to understand the federal judiciary by

  1. describing the organization, jurisdiction, and proceedings of federal courts;
  2. evaluating how the Marshall Court established the Supreme Court as an independent branch of government through its opinion in Marbury v. Madison;
  3. describing how the Supreme Court decides cases;
  4. comparing the philosophies of judicial activism and judicial restraint; and
  5. investigating and evaluating how the judiciary influences public policy by delineating the power of government and safeguarding the rights of the individual.

VUS.8

The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by

  1. explaining the westward movement of the population in the United States, with emphasis on the role of the railroads, communication systems, admission of new states to the Union, and the impact on American Indians;
  2. analyzing the factors that transformed the American economy from agrarian to industrial and explaining how major inventions transformed life in the United States, including the emergence of leisure activities;
  3. examining the contributions of new immigrants and evaluating the challenges they faced, including anti-immigration legislation;
  4. analyzing the impact of prejudice and discrimination, including “Jim Crow” laws, the responses of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, and the practice of eugenics in Virginia;
  5. evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; and
  6. evaluating and explaining the economic outcomes and the political, cultural, and social developments of the Progressive Movement and the impact of its legislation.

VUS.13

The student will apply social science skills to understand the social, political, and cultural movements and changes in the United States during the second half of the twentieth century by

  1. explaining the factors that led to United States expansion;
  2. evaluating and explaining the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, the roles of Thurgood Marshall and Oliver W. Hill, Sr., and how Virginia responded to the decision;
  3. explaining how the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the 1963 March on Washington, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) had an impact on all Americans;
  4. analyzing changes in immigration policy and the impact of increased immigration;
  5. evaluating and explaining the foreign and domestic policies pursued by the American government after the Cold War;
  6. explaining how scientific and technological advances altered American lives; and
  7. evaluating and explaining the changes that occurred in American culture.

Other Related Standards

FBLA Competitive Events and Activities Areas

Business Law

 

Entrepreneurship

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

Management Decision Making

The topic for this event changes from year to year. The annual topic may or may not correlate with this particular course. Please refer to the current Virginia FBLA State Handbook.

NBEA Achievement Standards for Management

Describe legal strategies used by labor and management (e.g., strikes, boycotts, layoffs, and lockouts).

 

Describe the history of the labor movement and why unions were organized.

 

Describe the process involved in forming, operating, and disbanding labor unions.

 

Describe the role of organized labor and its influence on government and business.

 

Discuss the appropriateness and effectiveness of current legislation in protecting workers' rights.

 

Identify and provide examples of the basic forms of business ownership (e.g., sole proprietorship, partnership, cooperative, LLC, and corporation).

 

Identify federal legislation affecting organized labor and management.

 

Identify specific state legislation affecting organized labor and management.